Some more thoughts from Wintersturmer

General Discussion about Wagner and The Ring of the Nibelung

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Some more thoughts from Wintersturmer

Postby alberich00 » Thu Dec 22, 2016 9:17 am

Greetings,

I did find a scrap of time to send you a brief thought on Parsifal regarding Amfortas and Kundry’s fruitless search for balms for the Wound. In past ramblings that I’ve sent to you, I opined that “balm” was a metaphor for religion, and that the Kundry’s last foray into Arabia (Act 1) brought back the latest version of the balm: Islam, which was also destined to fail to bring solace. I know that this is probably grasping at straws, but the healing plant resin known as the Balm of Gilead originates from a region east of Jordan; interestingly, it is also known as the Balm of Mecca. As I said, I’m probably over thinking this one, but I thought that I’d pass it on to you anyway. I’ve found that some Wagnerian passages that at first glance seem to only be filler are actually quite significant if one bothers to dig into them a bit.

Cheers,
Wintersturmer
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Re: Some more thoughts from Wintersturmer

Postby alberich00 » Thu Dec 22, 2016 9:20 am

Dear Wintersturmer:

Yes, in a certain respect my entire online book on Wagner's "Ring" has been an attempt to demonstrate that with respect to Wagner's libretti and music "... some Wagnerian passages that at first glance seem to only be filler are actually quite significant if one bothers to dig into them a bit."

Of course in my interpretation of "Parsifal" the balms Kundry attempts to bring, or has brought in the past, are all the various futile attempts to resolve mankind's existential dilemma, including religion, altruistic morality, and secular art, which were inspired by the model for all of Wagner's muses of inspiration, Eve (with whom Wagner himself compared Kundry). Eve, however, as understood by Feuerbach, who saw her as the patron saint of secularism and science, since her forbidden question (her insistence on knowing what God had forbidden), her breach of god's insistence on unquestioning faith, was not only the inspiration for religious faith (mankind's endless and ultimately futile attempt to restore the paradise that had been lost not by any human choice or breach of faith, but by the inevitable, natural evolution of reflective consciousness, which is what really drove us out of the paradise of animal preconsciousness), but also, according the Feuerbach, the inspiration for science which ultimately overthrows faith in gods. The interesting thing about Kundry is that she's both the cause of the Fall, symbolically, and the muse of inspiration for our attempt to restore the paradise from which the Fall she caused banished us. Thus in "Parsifal" she's both the cause of Amfortas's unhealing wound and the most earnest in efforts to offer a balm which might, she hopes, heal it. She is the source of both sin and its atonement.

If I can find the time I'm also going to post my annual meditation on the deep underlying harmony between certain aspects of Dickens's "A Christmas Carol" and Wagner's legacy.

Your man in wagnerheim.com,

Paul
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Re: Some more thoughts from Wintersturmer

Postby alberich00 » Thu Dec 22, 2016 9:22 am

Wintersturmer's brief response to my response:

Aha! Eve (and Brunhilde) as the female Prometheus! Womankind condemned to eternal suffering for acquiring the secrets of the Gods. Historically, I can see how Eve and her position of subservience could be a allegory to the Earth Goddess of the ancient polytheistic Canaanites, and referred to by the conquering monotheistic Hebrews and their bellicose sky god as “the Abomination.”
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