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Twilight of the Gods: Page 784
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figurations from Siegfried’s confrontation with Wotan in S.3.2?]) Hero and stallion on board a skiff (:#45; :#? [figurations from s.3.2?]): (#103?:) it is he who is blowing the horn so blithely (:#103?).

 

(#103: Gunther goes half way towards him, but then holds back, listening. as before: #40 vari/#59a/#103 [combined in an astonishingly moving passage. Does it also include #3 or #14 at this point?]) (#59a/#103:) A leisurely stroke, as of idle hand, drives the boat headlong against the stream; [the English version reverses entirely the German phrase order of the following sentence, so the motifs are not in their proper sequence] (#13 vari/#103 >>>> :) only he who slew the dragon can boast (#57? [which precedes the last phrase in the German]) such doughty strength in the sweep of the oar: - (#15/#103/#14) Siegfried it is: no other, surely! (#19 vari [as an orchestral explosion])

 

Gunther: (#3: [rapidly]) Is he sweeping past?

 

Hagen: (calling towards the river through cupped hands) (#17 or #19?:) Hoiho! Whither bound, you blithe-spirited hero (:#17 of #19?)?

 

Siegfried: (from the distance) To Gibich’s stalwart son. (#152 vari)

 

Hagen: (#152 >>>> :) I bid you welcome (#152: [double-time?]) to his hall (:#152): (Siegfried appears on the shore in a small boat. #152?) This way! Put in to shore here!

 

Gunther and Gutrune having wondered aloud how they might find Siegfried, Hagen, preceded by the motif of Alberich’s Curse on the Ring, #51 (with the sound of Siegfried’s youthful horncall #103 in the background foreshadowing Siegfried’s imminent arrival on the shore of the Rhine), says something seemingly insignificant but in truth quite extraordinary. Hagen says that when Siegfried rides out gaily in search of adventure (i.e., when Siegfried has an impulse to present a newly inspired artwork to his audience), the world becomes a narrow pinewood. Hagen goes on to suggest that given his nature, Siegfried will surely arrive at some point at Gibichung Hall, as indeed he will momentarily. Hagen has not made a random statement. By saying that while engaged in his (artistic) adventures, the entire world becomes a pinewood for Siegfried, Hagen is describing Wagner’s concept of the motival “Wonder,” whereby a huge array of thematically related phenomena, widely disbursed in time and space, become present, here and now, through the sounding of a musical motif which in the course of the drama has been associated with this huge array of seemingly disparate phenomena. In this way, according to Wagner, his musical motifs disclose a heretofore hidden unity underlying these distinct phenomena. Thus the entire world, as

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